Skin Cancer Check Ups - Medicine on Second
Medicine on Second is an award winning medical practice on the Sunshine Coast. Modern, innovative premises, coffee and a dedicated children's play area make going to the doctor an enjoyable experience.
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Skin Cancer Check Ups

Australia has the highest rate of skin cancer in the world. Two out of three Australians will develop skin cancer with over 380,000 people diagnosed every year. Out of all the states, Queensland has the highest rates in the country. Skin cancer is predominantly caused by overexposure to the sun’s ultraviolet radiation (UVR). At Medicine On Second we have the latest diagnostic tool which assists with the detection of skin cancer. The latest European technology Siascope provides an early mole scan warning system for the detection of melanin changes in all moles.

Siascope also assists in the management of non–melanoma (Basal Cell Carninoma). Siascope’s features include 20 micron sharp focus image resolution. A non–invasive (no scalpel) “Virtual” skin biopsy to 2.00mm skin depth and analysis of melanin pigment, blood supply and collagen skin structure. Siascope provides a unique early warning system for detection of melanin changes in all moles. Ask our reception staff about skin checks and SIAscans.

Fast Facts about Skin Cancer
  • Over 1300 Australians die from skin cancer each year.
  • Skin cancers account for around 80% of all new cancers diagnosed each year in Australia.
  • Melanoma is the fourth most common cancer site in Australian men after prostate, bowel and lung cancer.
  • Melanoma is the third most common cancer in Australian women after breast and bowel cancer.
Take the time to spot the difference

Remember to check your skin regularly. See your doctor if you notice a freckle, mole or lump that is new or changing in size, shape or colour, or a sore that does not heal.